Built with Berta.me

  1. .........

    ........

    ..................................................................................

    .......

  2. A Line Through It (in progress):

    A Line Through It is a series of images taken of the English-Scottish borderline. The border stretches 96 miles from the North Sea in the east to the Solway Firth in the west. The line moves across farmland, along country lanes and waterways, and follows hill tops and the open watershed of the Cheviot uplands.

    The history of this boundary is relatively long. The region now known as ‘The Borders’ evolved into a frontier land around 1000 years ago, with Britain's two most powerful groups meeting the limits of their dominance and control. The general positioning of the line was legally agreed upon by the respective kingdoms a little later in 1237. However, sections of the border’s exact location continued to be argued over throughout the following centuries, and early maps from the 18th century still show areas of dispute. Finally, our own contemporary conception of such a rigid line, in such an exact geographical space, is only really possible thanks to recent developments in mapping and publishing. Now not separating two independent sovereign states, the border does not currently hold international status; however, it is still seen as the dividing line between two distinct nations.

    In many of my images I have used the respective nations’ flags. The flags help to mark out this invisible line in the landscape and to show the separate national identities given to the land. They are also symbols of the political concept of nation and the forces that have positioned and maintain the border. Using them allows me to bring these abstract ideas overtly into the physical world and consider the two alongside each other.

    Borders are commonly pegged to natural markers such as waterways and hilly ridges. These features are handy easily-seen natural dividing lines, and they can also give a border a seemingly natural legitimacy. However, on exploring this landscape I have often felt that life and the flux of nature are constantly undermining and contradicting the concept of border. That without upkeep such a construct would soon break down.

  3. .........

    ..................................................................................