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  2. The point where the borderline enters / leaves the North Sea.

    The point where the borderline enters / leaves the North Sea.

    The point where the borderline enters / leaves the North Sea.

    The point where the borderline enters / leaves the North Sea.

    An old bracken-covered drystone wall marks the borderline under the sea cliffs where the border meets the North Sea.

    An old bracken-covered drystone wall marks the borderline under the sea cliffs where the border meets the North Sea.

    A farmer's ford across the border as it follows the River Sark.

    A farmer's ford across the border as it follows the River Sark.

    The border line cutting through birch trees as it follows the Scots' Dike. This part of the line was agreed upon in 1552. The dike represents a compromise as the two sides agreed to divide a disputed area called The Debateable Lands.

    The border line cutting through birch trees as it follows the Scots' Dike. This part of the line was agreed upon in 1552. The dike represents a compromise as the two sides agreed to divide a disputed area called The Debateable Lands.

    A hamlet divided by the border at the A7 crossing. The house on the left is in Scotland and the house on the right in England.

    A hamlet divided by the border at the A7 crossing. The house on the left is in Scotland and the house on the right in England.

    The border following the 'Boundary Road' near Berwick-upon-Tweed.

    The border following the 'Boundary Road' near Berwick-upon-Tweed.

    The border running along the centre of the River Tweed. Scotland is on the left and England on the right.

    The border running along the centre of the River Tweed. Scotland is on the left and England on the right.

    A modern ‘Welcome to Scotland’ sign at the A74 / M6 border crossing.

    A modern ‘Welcome to Scotland’ sign at the A74 / M6 border crossing.

    The borderline following a hedge through farmland in the ‘Eastern Debatable Lands’. This part of the border was disputed until 1799 when the Sheriff of Roxburgh arbitrated on the division of the land.

    The borderline following a hedge through farmland in the ‘Eastern Debatable Lands’. This part of the border was disputed until 1799 when the Sheriff of Roxburgh arbitrated on the division of the land.

    Looking across the border fence from England into Scotland.

    Looking across the border fence from England into Scotland.

    The border following a stream near Coquet Head. Scotland is on the left and England on the right.

    The border following a stream near Coquet Head. Scotland is on the left and England on the right.

    The border dividing a field as it follows the lowest contour of the slope near Duke’s Strip in the eastern Debatable Lands.

    The border dividing a field as it follows the lowest contour of the slope near Duke’s Strip in the eastern Debatable Lands.

    Fence posts marking the border on Larriston Fell.

    Fence posts marking the border on Larriston Fell.

    The border line cutting through igneous rock protruding from the top of a hill called The Schil. The rock was formed by volcanic activity around 400 million years ago.

    The border line cutting through igneous rock protruding from the top of a hill called The Schil. The rock was formed by volcanic activity around 400 million years ago.

    The border line cutting across the natural features of the Cheviot Hills from White Law Nick. An early military survey map shows this area of the border as 'disputed' in 1755.

    The border line cutting across the natural features of the Cheviot Hills from White Law Nick. An early military survey map shows this area of the border as 'disputed' in 1755.

    Looking across the border from Scotland toward a house in England. The unmarked borderline crosses the grass in the foreground.

    Looking across the border from Scotland toward a house in England. The unmarked borderline crosses the grass in the foreground.

    A broken flag pole at the Carter Bar crossing point. Carter Bar is the highest road crossing along the border and is regularly exposed to high precipitation, strong winds and low temperatures.

    A broken flag pole at the Carter Bar crossing point. Carter Bar is the highest road crossing along the border and is regularly exposed to high precipitation, strong winds and low temperatures.

    The border dividing the Kielder Stone on the eastern slopes of Peel Fell. The Kielder Stone is made of sandstone, formed by river sediment around 340 million years ago.

    The border dividing the Kielder Stone on the eastern slopes of Peel Fell. The Kielder Stone is made of sandstone, formed by river sediment around 340 million years ago.

    A stile over the border fence as it crosses Carter Fell in the Cheviot Hills. A map from 1794 shows this area of the border as 'disputed'.

    A stile over the border fence as it crosses Carter Fell in the Cheviot Hills. A map from 1794 shows this area of the border as 'disputed'.

    The border line crossing open moorland on Kielder Moor between Carter Fell and Peel Fell.

    The border line crossing open moorland on Kielder Moor between Carter Fell and Peel Fell.

    • 1

      The point where the borderline enters / leaves the North Sea.

    • 2

      An old bracken-covered drystone wall marks the borderline under the sea cliffs where the border meets the North Sea.

    • 3

      A farmer's ford across the border as it follows the River Sark.

    • 4

      The border line cutting through birch trees as it follows the Scots' Dike. This part of the line was agreed upon in 1552. The dike represents a compromise as the two sides agreed to divide a disputed area called The Debateable Lands.

    • 5

      A hamlet divided by the border at the A7 crossing. The house on the left is in Scotland and the house on the right in England.

    • 6

      The border following the 'Boundary Road' near Berwick-upon-Tweed.

    • 7

      The border running along the centre of the River Tweed. Scotland is on the left and England on the right.

    • 8

      A modern ‘Welcome to Scotland’ sign at the A74 / M6 border crossing.

    • 9

      The borderline following a hedge through farmland in the ‘Eastern Debatable Lands’. This part of the border was disputed until 1799 when the Sheriff of Roxburgh arbitrated on the division of the land.

    • 10

      Looking across the border fence from England into Scotland.

    • 11

      The border following a stream near Coquet Head. Scotland is on the left and England on the right.

    • 12

      The border dividing a field as it follows the lowest contour of the slope near Duke’s Strip in the eastern Debatable Lands.

    • 13
    • 14

      Fence posts marking the border on Larriston Fell.

    • 15

      The border line cutting through igneous rock protruding from the top of a hill called The Schil. The rock was formed by volcanic activity around 400 million years ago.

    • 16

      The border line cutting across the natural features of the Cheviot Hills from White Law Nick. An early military survey map shows this area of the border as 'disputed' in 1755.

    • 17

      Looking across the border from Scotland toward a house in England. The unmarked borderline crosses the grass in the foreground.

    • 18

      A broken flag pole at the Carter Bar crossing point. Carter Bar is the highest road crossing along the border and is regularly exposed to high precipitation, strong winds and low temperatures.

    • 19

      The border dividing the Kielder Stone on the eastern slopes of Peel Fell. The Kielder Stone is made of sandstone, formed by river sediment around 340 million years ago.

    • 20

      A stile over the border fence as it crosses Carter Fell in the Cheviot Hills. A map from 1794 shows this area of the border as 'disputed'.

    • 21

      The border line crossing open moorland on Kielder Moor between Carter Fell and Peel Fell.